SALT LAKE CITY — August 31, 2016

Recently an anonymous individual or group sent a packet to many people and organizations involved with Sunstone and Mormon studies noting that Wikipedia articles were quoted from but not cited in two recent Sunstone articles: “An Overview of Mormon Fundamentalist Groups” and “Does ‘Mormon’ Still Equal Polygamy?” This was an editorial oversight. The main author had informed us that portions of the articles included material from Wikipedia, but we neglected to cite them appropriately. We deeply regret these lapses; it is our standard that credit be given where it is due. We will print corrections in the next issue of Sunstone so that they can be a matter of record. We appreciate being made aware of these mistakes. In the future, anyone who has questions, comments, or concerns regarding any aspect of the work being done by the Sunstone Education Foundation is invited to contact our office directly: 801-355-5926.

For more information, contact Sunstone Executive Director Jim Murphy:


The 2014 #Sunstone Symposium has made the news several times over! Check out the great coverage:

Fox 13: Ordain Women members discuss impact of Kate Kelly’s excommunication

The Daily Beast: Mormon Reformers Behind the ‘Zion Curtain’ Refused to Be Silenced

The Salt Lake Tribune: Mormon Feminists Discuss Tone and the Patriarchy

City Weekly: Mormons Talk Guns, Faith and White Privilege


On June 11, 2014 the New York Times broke a story about church disciplinary councils for two “activists,” Kate Kelly of Ordain Women and John Dehlin of Mormon Stories (also a former Executive Director of Sunstone).  Kate Kelly received a letter  from the bishop of her congregation in Virginia informing her that a disciplinary hearing had been set for June 22, 2014 to discuss the possibility of church discipline.  John Dehlin received his letter from a local church leader in Logan, Utah, on Monday, giving him until June 18 to resign from the faith or face an excommunication hearing.

This is the first high-profile example of excommunication proceedings since 1993 and the famed, “September Six.” That year the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints disciplined six Mormon writers, scholars and feminists.

Sunstone provided a critical forum for open discussion of the events of September 1993 and the ripples through the Mormon community afterward. Below is collection of SUNSTONE magazine articles and Sunstone Symposium audio recordings discussing the September Six, other high profile excommunications, and the effects of excommunication in the larger LDS community:

This is Sunstone’s original report of the September Six proceedings and the follow-up piece.

Sunstone Editor Elbert Peck wrote an editorial on the events here.


Looking Back-

Here are the reflections of the six 10 years after the events:

Lynne K. Whitesides’, “The Dance of Love.”

Paul Toscano’s,  “An Interview With Myself.

Maxine Hanks’, “Exile and Return.”

D. Michael Quinn’s,Apologia Pro Mea Via.”

Lavina Fielding Anderson’s, “A Decade on Thin Edge.”


 Audio on the Events:


  • While LDS beliefs often focus on eternal unity, when differences of belief arise in LDS families, estrangement is too often the result, especially when the differing beliefs involve controversial issues such as apostasy, excommunication, inactivity, joining another faith, and sexual orientation. This panel consists of counseling professionals who deal regularly with estrangement issues, and with those who have experienced belief-related estrangement in their own lives.  
  • When Beliefs Lead To Estrangement panel with Carolyn Campbell, Ardean Watts, Morgan Smith, Julian Hatch, Duane Jennings, Dennis Higley, Rauni Higley, Alex Nibley, Marybeth Raynes


  • December 2009 marks the 30th anniversary of Sonia Johnson’s excommunication. Many younger Mormon women know little about the 1970s battle over the ERA. Some have picked up negative associations about Sonia Johnson and Mormons for ERA from parents or others who felt that speaking out publicly against the LDS Church was inappropriate. We’ll review Sonia’s outspoken support of the ERA, how it led to her excommunication, and explore whether she had lasting influence on women in the Church—or on the Church itself. We’ll also discuss whether there are differences between Mormon feminists today and 1970s activists and whether Church rhetoric about women has shifted in the 30 years since Sonia made headlines.
  • Sonia Johnson: Mormon Feminist Role Model or Cautionary Tale? with Kay Gaisford, Nadine R. Hansen







Sunstone Magazine got a shout out in The Guardian this month!  Click out the article here, titled:  Neil LaBute: Better for me not to be a Mormon than a bad Mormon.

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